Kelvin Walk Part 1

My wife and I set off onthe kelvin walk on Saturday. The weater was not promising but we decided to chance it anyway. We decided to park down by the Kelvin at the side of the Kelvin Hall and walked over to our starting point on the old Partick bridge.

The University from the Old Partick bridge

The University from the Old Partick bridge

This is the second time we have taken this walk and decided not to stick by the river on the way through the park. We took the top path to get a flavour of the history of the place. I noticed some memorials had been placed, some on benches and some on trees. Some record long forgotten Glasgow characters.

From the days of music hall?

From the days of music hall?

Heading along the path we came across Glasgow’s own copy of the Port Sunlight worker’s cottages. This seems a bit out of place or is it just an unexpected treasure? I’m still not sure of the significance.

Port Sunlight in Glasgow?

Port Sunlight in Glasgow?

Coming out of the park we visited the now refurbished Bandstand. It looks really good now. It should be a venue for all sorts of events – if the weather permits. That’s not guaranteed this summer, I’m afraid.

The Upgraded bandstand.

The Upgraded bandstand.

A walk throught the other side of the park (The Kelvin Way divides the park here) reveals  a place of relaxation for all sorts of people. Families out for a stroll and an attempt to tire out the children, teenagers having a kickabout with a ball and cyclists finding a safe route through the city.

Passing under the bridge that takes Woodlands Road over the river we find ourselves in a less frequented park that follows the river up to Great Western Road at Kelvinbridge. The artwork on the bare walls gives the space an out of city atmosphere.

Through the bridge.

Through the bridge.

This space has a play park and a Park and Ride facility for the subway station. At the other end we come to the magnificent bridge that takes Great Western Road over the river. There is even a pub where you can stop for food and refreshment.

A watering place by the water.

A watering place by the water.

Once through the bridge we get a good look at the torrent of water that is flowing in the kelvin today. The heavy rains of the last few weeks have changed the character of this normally placid stretch.

Fast flowing water today.

Fast flowing water today.

The next stretch is quieter but still has  walkers and cyclists regularly passing. On the opposite bank we see a well designed building which seems to incorporate an office and living quarters. The building ins nicely set into the bank and gives a beautiful, peaceful outlook. I’m not sure how you would get much work done looking out over the river.

Riverside office.

Riverside office.

Walking on we pass under the beautiful arch of the bridge carrying Belmont street over the river. From street level you get no idea of the beautiful arches that support the road. From the waterside the view is more spectacular.

A spectacular arch.

A spectacular arch.

We move on and cross the river to find the old flint mill. There is only a ruin left but the mill race still flows, showing how the slight drop in water level produced power. I would never have imagined that this quiet place was once a hive of industry.

The Old Flint Mill

The Old Flint Mill

Soon we are heading up to the bridge at Queen Margaret Drive where once the BBC broadcast to the nation. we pass under anothe beautivul arch and come to the iron bridge that takes us out of the River Walk and escape to the Botanic Gardens.

The wee iron bridge.

The wee iron bridge.

This is enough for one afternoon. The Botanics becons and just beyond lies Byres Road and all the wee shops. Perhaps we can get a bite toeat there. The walking has made me hungry. I’m determined to do the next leg of the journey soon. I’ll post the results as soon as I do.

Exit to the Botanics.

Exit to the Botanics.

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